Tag Archives: Candy Japan

Candy Japan, early February 2015

Candy Japan is a monthly subscription service that delivers every other week. As the name says, you get japanese candy. This is the shipment that was sent out in early february.

Puchi Pasuteru

Crunchy candy balls topped with chocolate in a number of random shapes. The candy balls are kind of dull, the chocolate is good, and the concept is excellent. All the fun of Rowntree’s Randoms but with chocolate. This pack contained ice cream cones, trains, pumpkins, ghosts, and space ships, among other shapes. I am so sold.

Limone Double Chocolate

Sugared lemon jelly covered in white and dark chocolate. The chocolate is very good, but I’m not a fan of citrus in other stuff, so I’ll pass on these.

Mini Boro

Tiny crunchy candies that turn into a horrible, dry powder when you eat it. Awful stuff. These should make suitable punishment the next time my gaming group is being bad.

Candy Japan, late november 2014

Candy Japan is a monthly subscription service that delivers every other week. As the name says, you get japanese candy. This is the shipment that was sent out in late november.

Grape candy floss

In this bag we found a sheet of pink candy floss. Hidden in the sheet was purple fizz rocks/powder. I wanted to take a picture of the contents because candy floss in a bag looked so odd, but the sour fizz against the sweet floss just tasted so good we ate it all before pictures could happen. I need someone to send me regular supplies of just this.

Wine gums

I think the wine gums in this were supposed to look like the cute creatures pictured on the bag, but the gums were so tiny you can’t really tell any detail. Taste was generically fruity. Not very exciting, but the bag disappeared within a couple of hours.

Rose chews

Chewy sweets with a hard shell. I didn’t notice any significant rosy scent while devouring the whole bag like a sugar-starved hermit.

Candy Japan, early november 2014

Candy Japan is a monthly subscription service that delivers every other week. As the name says, you get japanese candy. This is the shipment that was sent out in early november.

Dry chocolate balls filled with a sweet, green filling. So delicious cute boy and I nearly snorted the bag between us.

Based on the pictures on the bag, we though these single-wrapped sheets were bubblegum. They are not. They are wine gum sheets that taste of rubbery sadness.

Sweet biscuit sticks with a coating, that’s pocky, right? I guess that makes this Poképocky. I’m not entirely sure what the coating is on these, but it tastes kind of yoghurty.

I think pocky is kind of dry and dull, and would never buy it myself by choice. It’s okay when presented to me like this, though. At least the bag emptied somehow…

Candy Japan, late october 2014

There are so many interesting subscription boxes out there — or in other words, my Lip Factory money quickly found somewhere else to go: Candy Japan. It’s a very simple service: Every other week, you get an envelope with japanese candy. Works for me!

The package don’t have names, numbers or any kind of identifiers, so I have to refer to them by their shipment period. My first envelope is from the late october shipment. There’s no product card or any kind of description included, so I have no extra info on any of the products.

This bag contains banana-flavoured foam monkeys, and a cardboard display you can assemble. I think it’s a game you can play with the monkeys? The kids in the instructions certainly look like they’re having fun.

These candies are a bit drier and firmer than foam candies I’m used to. Cute boy and I finished off the entire bag before I finished writing this review, so there were clearly no major complaints.

Individually wrapped, fruit-flavoured hard candies. There’s a pretty flower on each candy’s wrapping.

I can get similar candies in a dozen varieties from any shop around here. Like other candies of this type, they taste mostly of sugar and only vaguely fruity. Not a major hit, but they’ll keep forever, so they can stay in the back of a drawer and be re-discovered when someone’s desperately searching for a sugar fix.